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70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor • Downtown workers gathered around a loudspeaker at Eighth and Olive streets, outside the federal Custom House (now the Old Post Office), to hear a live broadcast of President Franklin Roosevelt’s war speech to a joint session of Congress. The day before, Japan bombed a U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Congress quickly ratified the declaration of war, as seen on the front page of the Post-Dispatch on Dec. 8. (The government didn’t confirm the destruction of the USS Arizona for another week.) You can see me at the bottom of the page — there was no “bird line” phrase that day. (Post-Dispatch archives)

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A former Consolidated Service Car Co. driver picks up customers at Ninth and Cole streets downtown on Dec. 7, 1965, a few days into the Committee of Racial Equality boycott of Bi-State Transit System to save what was left of service cars. In 1965, they charged 20 cents per rider. That was 10 cents cheaper that buses, but buses allowed free transfers. The defiant owner-operators erased Consolidated’s name from their cars. (Lester Linck/Post-Dispatch archives)
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A former Consolidated Service Car Co. driver picks up customers at Ninth and Cole streets downtown on Dec. 7, 1965, a few days into the Committee of Racial Equality boycott of Bi-State Transit System to save what was left of service cars. In 1965, they charged 20 cents per rider. That was 10 cents cheaper that buses, but buses allowed free transfers. The defiant owner-operators erased Consolidated’s name from their cars. (Lester Linck/Post-Dispatch archives)

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Tags #ray renard    #egan's rats    #1924    #st. louis    #stl    #kerry patch   

Tags #history    #st. louis    #1864    #civil war   

The Climatron at the Missouri Botanical Garden celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2009. Construction began at the garden in 1959, and cost $700,000 — almost double the projection. Today, it provides cover for 2,800 plants, including palm trees, devil flowers, spider lilies and orchids. (Photo by Johnny Andrews / jandrews@post-dispatch.com)

The Climatron at the Missouri Botanical Garden celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2009. Construction began at the garden in 1959, and cost $700,000 — almost double the projection. Today, it provides cover for 2,800 plants, including palm trees, devil flowers, spider lilies and orchids. (Photo by Johnny Andrews / jandrews@post-dispatch.com)

Workers assemble the first rows of aluminum tubes in October 1959 to build the Climatron at the Missouri Botanical Garden. The tubes create interlocking hexagons, (six-sided structures) to form a 70-foot-high dome that needs no interior vertical supports. Local architects Wayne Mackey Sr. and Joseph Murphy designed the building with inspiration from prolific inventor R. Buckminster Fuller, who patented the “geodesic dome.” (Photo by Buel White / Post-Dispatch)

Workers assemble the first rows of aluminum tubes in October 1959 to build the Climatron at the Missouri Botanical Garden. The tubes create interlocking hexagons, (six-sided structures) to form a 70-foot-high dome that needs no interior vertical supports. Local architects Wayne Mackey Sr. and Joseph Murphy designed the building with inspiration from prolific inventor R. Buckminster Fuller, who patented the “geodesic dome.” (Photo by Buel White / Post-Dispatch)