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70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor • Downtown workers gathered around a loudspeaker at Eighth and Olive streets, outside the federal Custom House (now the Old Post Office), to hear a live broadcast of President Franklin Roosevelt’s war speech to a joint session of Congress. The day before, Japan bombed a U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Congress quickly ratified the declaration of war, as seen on the front page of the Post-Dispatch on Dec. 8. (The government didn’t confirm the destruction of the USS Arizona for another week.) You can see me at the bottom of the page — there was no “bird line” phrase that day. (Post-Dispatch archives)

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Tags #pearl harbor    #st. louis    #news    #history    #weatherbird   

Tags #history    #st. louis    #1864    #civil war   

The Climatron at the Missouri Botanical Garden celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2009. Construction began at the garden in 1959, and cost $700,000 — almost double the projection. Today, it provides cover for 2,800 plants, including palm trees, devil flowers, spider lilies and orchids. (Photo by Johnny Andrews / jandrews@post-dispatch.com)

The Climatron at the Missouri Botanical Garden celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2009. Construction began at the garden in 1959, and cost $700,000 — almost double the projection. Today, it provides cover for 2,800 plants, including palm trees, devil flowers, spider lilies and orchids. (Photo by Johnny Andrews / jandrews@post-dispatch.com)

Workers assemble the first rows of aluminum tubes in October 1959 to build the Climatron at the Missouri Botanical Garden. The tubes create interlocking hexagons, (six-sided structures) to form a 70-foot-high dome that needs no interior vertical supports. Local architects Wayne Mackey Sr. and Joseph Murphy designed the building with inspiration from prolific inventor R. Buckminster Fuller, who patented the “geodesic dome.” (Photo by Buel White / Post-Dispatch)

Workers assemble the first rows of aluminum tubes in October 1959 to build the Climatron at the Missouri Botanical Garden. The tubes create interlocking hexagons, (six-sided structures) to form a 70-foot-high dome that needs no interior vertical supports. Local architects Wayne Mackey Sr. and Joseph Murphy designed the building with inspiration from prolific inventor R. Buckminster Fuller, who patented the “geodesic dome.” (Photo by Buel White / Post-Dispatch)

When the St. Louis Merchants Exchange building opened in 1875, it was a bustling affair, fitting for the importance of the new building to commerce and society. Grain traders used its vast hall to buy and sell the harvests that poured into St. Louis by steamboat, railroad and horse cart. The following year, the Democratic Party held its national convention there, choosing Samuel J. Tilden as their candidate. Last call was Sept. 13, 1957. Traders watched as closing prices were posted on the final day of trading at Merchants Exchange. The business moved to a new, forgettably modern brick building at 5100 Oakland Avenue. Wreckers moved in, and for the next 26 years the Pine and Third streets location was a parking lot. (David Gulick • Post-Dispatch archives)
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When the St. Louis Merchants Exchange building opened in 1875, it was a bustling affair, fitting for the importance of the new building to commerce and society. Grain traders used its vast hall to buy and sell the harvests that poured into St. Louis by steamboat, railroad and horse cart. The following year, the Democratic Party held its national convention there, choosing Samuel J. Tilden as their candidate. Last call was Sept. 13, 1957. Traders watched as closing prices were posted on the final day of trading at Merchants Exchange. The business moved to a new, forgettably modern brick building at 5100 Oakland Avenue. Wreckers moved in, and for the next 26 years the Pine and Third streets location was a parking lot. (David Gulick • Post-Dispatch archives)

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Tags #1861    #history    #st. louis    #stl    #james eads    #civil war    #gunboat    #carondelet    #abraham lincoln    #river des peres   

James B. Eads, salvage king of the Mississippi River, promised President Abraham Lincoln he could build iron-armored gunboats in 65 days. On Aug. 7, 1861, Eads won a contract to build seven burly gunboats from a novel design. At $89,000 apiece, each was to carry 13 heavy cannons, have 2.5-inches of armor and be delivered to Cairo, Ill., in 60 days. The gunboats were built in the Eads Boatyard in Carondelet. The gunboat’s five boilers, seen here, sat side-by-side and powered the engines that turned a single enclosed paddlewheel. (U.S. Naval Historical Center)
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James B. Eads, salvage king of the Mississippi River, promised President Abraham Lincoln he could build iron-armored gunboats in 65 days. On Aug. 7, 1861, Eads won a contract to build seven burly gunboats from a novel design. At $89,000 apiece, each was to carry 13 heavy cannons, have 2.5-inches of armor and be delivered to Cairo, Ill., in 60 days. The gunboats were built in the Eads Boatyard in Carondelet. The gunboat’s five boilers, seen here, sat side-by-side and powered the engines that turned a single enclosed paddlewheel. (U.S. Naval Historical Center)

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