A scene at the Grand Mississippi Valley Sanitary Fair, held from May 17 to June 18, 1864, in St. Louis to raise money for assisting Union troops, their families and freed slaves. A temporary building was erected for the fair in the middle of 12th Street (now Tucker Boulevard) on the two blocks north of Olive Street. It had 54 booths that sold food, clothing, needlework and Missouri-made wine and beer. Many members of the Ladies’ Union Aid Society members wanted to ban beer, but relented in a nod to the many pro-Union and pro-beer German immigrants in St. Louis. This booth was named for Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, who had lived for a time in St. Louis and was, at the time of the Sanitary Fair, leading a series of bloody battles in Virginia against the Confederate army of Gen. Robert E. Lee. (Missouri History Museum)
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A scene at the Grand Mississippi Valley Sanitary Fair, held from May 17 to June 18, 1864, in St. Louis to raise money for assisting Union troops, their families and freed slaves. A temporary building was erected for the fair in the middle of 12th Street (now Tucker Boulevard) on the two blocks north of Olive Street. It had 54 booths that sold food, clothing, needlework and Missouri-made wine and beer. Many members of the Ladies’ Union Aid Society members wanted to ban beer, but relented in a nod to the many pro-Union and pro-beer German immigrants in St. Louis. This booth was named for Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, who had lived for a time in St. Louis and was, at the time of the Sanitary Fair, leading a series of bloody battles in Virginia against the Confederate army of Gen. Robert E. Lee. (Missouri History Museum)

See more photos from the fair »

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