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70th anniversary of Pearl Harbor • Downtown workers gathered around a loudspeaker at Eighth and Olive streets, outside the federal Custom House (now the Old Post Office), to hear a live broadcast of President Franklin Roosevelt’s war speech to a joint session of Congress. The day before, Japan bombed a U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Congress quickly ratified the declaration of war, as seen on the front page of the Post-Dispatch on Dec. 8. (The government didn’t confirm the destruction of the USS Arizona for another week.) You can see me at the bottom of the page — there was no “bird line” phrase that day. (Post-Dispatch archives)

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A former Consolidated Service Car Co. driver picks up customers at Ninth and Cole streets downtown on Dec. 7, 1965, a few days into the Committee of Racial Equality boycott of Bi-State Transit System to save what was left of service cars. In 1965, they charged 20 cents per rider. That was 10 cents cheaper that buses, but buses allowed free transfers. The defiant owner-operators erased Consolidated’s name from their cars. (Lester Linck/Post-Dispatch archives)
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A former Consolidated Service Car Co. driver picks up customers at Ninth and Cole streets downtown on Dec. 7, 1965, a few days into the Committee of Racial Equality boycott of Bi-State Transit System to save what was left of service cars. In 1965, they charged 20 cents per rider. That was 10 cents cheaper that buses, but buses allowed free transfers. The defiant owner-operators erased Consolidated’s name from their cars. (Lester Linck/Post-Dispatch archives)

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"I’m no angel, but I intend to lead an honest life after I do my seven. I’m man enough to take my medicine."

Ray “the Fox” Renard, one-time wheelman for the notorious gang called Egan’s Rats, testifying about a big Rat caper — the robbery of $2.4 million in cash and bonds from a mail truck at Fourth and Locust streets on April 2, 1923.

Ray “the Fox” Renard, former gangster with Egan’s Rats, enjoys a Prohibition-era swig in February 1925, shortly after testifying against his former cronies in federal court. Renard, 26, had grown up in an orphanage and was a young pickpocket when he joined the gang. Egan’s Rats was formed in Kerry Patch, the Irish neighborhood northwest of downtown, and muscled into bootlegging during Prohibition, but its specialty was big-time robbery. Renard was sent to federal prison for a freight-car robbery and, upon hearing that his fellow gangsters might try to kill him to keep him quiet, went to the prosecutors. He said he knew all about two big heists, the $2.4 million robbery of bonds and cash from a mail truck at Fourth and Locust streets on April 2, 1923, and of a $54,000 payroll robbery at the Staunton, Ill., train station the following May 26. When the picture was taken, he was soon to be returned to federal prison. (St. Louis Star)
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Ray “the Fox” Renard, former gangster with Egan’s Rats, enjoys a Prohibition-era swig in February 1925, shortly after testifying against his former cronies in federal court. Renard, 26, had grown up in an orphanage and was a young pickpocket when he joined the gang. Egan’s Rats was formed in Kerry Patch, the Irish neighborhood northwest of downtown, and muscled into bootlegging during Prohibition, but its specialty was big-time robbery. Renard was sent to federal prison for a freight-car robbery and, upon hearing that his fellow gangsters might try to kill him to keep him quiet, went to the prosecutors. He said he knew all about two big heists, the $2.4 million robbery of bonds and cash from a mail truck at Fourth and Locust streets on April 2, 1923, and of a $54,000 payroll robbery at the Staunton, Ill., train station the following May 26. When the picture was taken, he was soon to be returned to federal prison. (St. Louis Star)

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Tags #ray renard    #egan's rats    #1924    #prohibition   

Tags #ray renard    #egan's rats    #1924    #st. louis    #stl    #kerry patch   

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Teammates welcome Cardinals third baseman Ken Boyer as he reaches home on a sixth-inning grand slam homer on Oct. 11, 1964, in Game 4 of the World Series against the Yankees. Greeting him are Cari Warwick, Dick Groat and Curt Flood, all of whom were on base when Boyer hit the homerun. At left is Bill White, the next batter. Boyer’s blast put the Cardinals in front, 4-3 at the time. The Yankees were not able to recover; the Cardinals won the game 4-3, and won the Series. Boyer is among 10 candidates for baseball’s Hall of Fame. (Photo by the Associated Press) 
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Teammates welcome Cardinals third baseman Ken Boyer as he reaches home on a sixth-inning grand slam homer on Oct. 11, 1964, in Game 4 of the World Series against the Yankees. Greeting him are Cari Warwick, Dick Groat and Curt Flood, all of whom were on base when Boyer hit the homerun. At left is Bill White, the next batter. Boyer’s blast put the Cardinals in front, 4-3 at the time. The Yankees were not able to recover; the Cardinals won the game 4-3, and won the Series. Boyer is among 10 candidates for baseball’s Hall of Fame. (Photo by the Associated Press) 

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